Phlowers – The Garden Blues with Purple

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Salvia – Wildflower garden – type unknown

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Unknown Bush/Perennial – Anyone with an idea of what this beautiful blossom might be??? Let me know in comment section. I “should-a, would-a, could-a” written it down, but didn’t, and have since forgotten what this plant is named. ūüė¶

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Blue salvia

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Achimenes

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Persian Shield – true name/Strobilanthes

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Vitex Bush – Also known as Chasteberry

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Larkspur – Wildflower Garden

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Verbena bonariensis

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Hyacinth Bean Vine

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Morning Glory Vine

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Petunia

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Nicandra – Shoo-fly Plant (This is an odd plant with interesting pods after the bloom period. I will¬†posting more information about¬† this flower/bush¬†tomorrow.) Change that…researched the plant a bit and it is the nightshade family, in short, it is probably full of toxins and quite poisonous. I’m glad it is growing out front where the children can’t get to it. Even though I consider the flower pretty…I probably won’t grow again until everyone is much older.

Plants – Flower Garden Update/August 2012


My late-summer flower garden is thriving. The Rudbeckia is full of blossoms. I don’t deadhead these flowers. They do not produce more blooms if I do so, and then I would deprive the finches of their treat. These flowers produce hundreds of seeds and are a favorite of the goldfinches. I often see the small birds hanging upside down on the seed heads, feasting on the bounty.

The Coral Nymph Salvia is a beautiful plant. It almost becomes shrub-like as the season progresses. I do deadhead the spent flower stalks of this plant, and it keeps producing until cold weather. It is a favorite of hummingbirds.

This Salvia self-seeded last summer, grew in a crack between the sidewalk and front porch steps, and is thriving. I will save seeds from this plant this fall. It has a resilience and determination I admire.

The Popsock Cosmos I grew this year is a bit taller than I had thought it would be, but is still a welcome addition to the front garden.

These cheerful petunias I bought on a whim this spring have been fantastic. I love the bright color and the abundance of blooms they have given me.

The coleus plants in the front garden are outstanding. I will soon let them begin to flower for next year’s seed harvest.

The asters I grew by winter-sowing are beautiful. They come in a variety of purple, lavender and pink shades. I am really pleased with this plant.

The Bonariensis Verbena is often perennial. This patch grew tall and broad this year and is constantly attracting butterflies. Last year it also self-seeded, and I have several new patches of this great plant.

Dahlias grown from seed and sun-loving impatiens (a Mother’s Day gift) are all doing well.

Here is one of my mistakes, although I love the lilypad-like foliage. I planted nasturtium in fertilized soil, and the foliage is abundant, but the flowers non-existent. They prefer to grow in poor soil.

Both varieties of Fuschia are doing well, as are both varieties of the Dragon-wing Begonias.

 

Last but not least is my Lady In Red Salvia, a great hummingbird flower. I love the little hover-fly sipping nectar that I captured in the photograph below.