Photo Challenge – Weather Vane Wednesday & Sea-Beans

I spotted the weather vane as we drove over the bridge into Cape May. We were there for a winter getaway. The weather never cooperated…nothing but cloudy sky. Bah! Oh well, we told ourselves, at least the indoor pool will be warm. Bah! The heater in the pool was broken, the water about as cold as the ocean water. I swam one lap in that cold water and felt like a Viking conqueror. It’s been eternally dreary here this past year. We had over 140 days with precipitation, and that doesn’t even include the days that were overcast and grey.

We walked the beach anyway, for only a few minutes though, my husband was one of the unlucky ones who came down with a terrible case of cold/flu that lasted for weeks. In NC, my sister told me, they call this sickness, “The Crud.” Someone even invented a medicine to combat it called Carolina Crud Crusher.

Even though our beach walk was short I found a pod, a sea-bean pod. Determined to make the best of the day, I took that bean pod home, sure it must have followed the gulf stream from the tropics to the beach of Cape May. (It might have, but it is also possible it is a pod from a local tree.) I consider all beach drift a gift from the sea. A love of natural beach detritus will probably never die in me. I put the pod in the pocket of my winter coat and took it home. This past week I added some unknown seeds found on the edges of bay waters to my sea bean cache.

I nicked the edges of half the seeds in the pod and have them soaking in water with a discarded rotisserie chicken container at the ready, filled with potting soil, a stand-in for a greenhouse. I will plant them tomorrow after their overnight soak. I can’t wait to see if they will grow.

Thank you to these bloggers for taking part in last week’s challenge. Take a look at their terrific weather vanes:
The 59 Club – Double Duty
Exloring Colour – Weathercock

The Photo Challenge: Each Wednesday, I post a photograph of a Weather Vane with a short description of where it can be found and any history connected to it. The main focus of the challenge is the photo of the Weather Vane and the location. The challenge can be Wordless if that is what you choose. If you would like others to see your post leave a link to your blog in the comment box. You can also tag the post #weathervaneweds. If you place a link to my post in your post you will create a pingback that will appear in the comment section. The challenge is open all week for comments and posts. Thanks so much for taking part in my challenge.

Many thanks to Cee, of Cee’s Photography, for including this challenge in her listing of WordPress Challenges. If you love challenges take a look at this page and while you are there check out some of Cee’s terrific posts. Thanks Cee!

Quote & Photograph – The Heart of November

“November is usually such a disagreeable month as if the year had suddenly found out she was growing old and could do nothing but weep and fret over it.” ~ Anne Shirley (L.M . Montgomery)

I love the heart of Anne Shirley in L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables novels. There are so many wise quotes and life lessons in the books. I’ve read the stories many times over and love to rewatch Megan Follows as Anne Shirley in the 1980’s series, Anne of Green Gables.

November is full of change; the glorious jewel-like colors of Autumn leaves have vanished and left behind the rough textures of grasses burnished to golden hues by the frost. The cooler weather has cleared out the dense undergrowth in our forests, giving us the opportunity to indulge in a short hike this past weekend.

We’ve always wanted to see this beautiful pond up close, but it would be lunacy to try and forge through the massive amounts of undergrowth in summer. In November, when bare branches rule the day, it was finally possible to clamber over the strands of thorny, but leafless brambles to get our first look at this small pond near Belleplain State Forest.

Photo Challenge – What is That?

On Saturday, during our walk at the Tall Pines State Preserve, a forest filled with beautiful pines and deciduous trees, we came upon a beautiful lake. We noticed a strange bird, or large bug of some kind, hovering over the water. Could it be a late-season hummingbird?

I took out my camera and zoomed in.

And zoomed again even closer…

There it hung, a lure cast too close to the tree branches. It will probably hang for years on the ultra-durable monofilament fishing line. Unless of course someone like me, who doesn’t mind getting wet feet, wades out and cuts it down.

We have quite a collection of washed-up fishing lures collected from beaches we visit. The photo shows our largest find. It is about six inches long and has gigantic hooks. It hangs on our back porch year round, far out of reach and beyond the height of anyone’s head. One day I’m hoping to make it the stationary piece of a ‘found lure’ mobile or wind chime.

I wonder if the Tall Pine’s lure will still be hanging when I visit again.

This post is part of Kammie’s Oddball Challenge.