Pheathers – Cornell Lab Live Bird Cams

Every year I like to include links to these amazing bird cams courtesy of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Nesting birds, feeders with frequent visitors, exotic locations, bird lovers will find these sites addictive. Enjoy.

If you have Youtube through Amazon Fire TV, or another means, you can watch the Bird Cams in large-sized format. My cat watches quite often and is so content if he finds a patch of sun to lay in while the bird feeder cams are on the television. Fun!

There are many more bird cams available on the Cornell Lab of Ornithology website.

 

 

 

Pheathers – Brown Thrasher

I saw this beautiful bird near my feeder this week. He is not a normal visitor to my yard. Once again I relied on my camera’s zoom feature to get a good look at him. I was able to identify him as a Brown Thrasher. Cornell Lab of Ornithology has good information on the Brown Thrasher and also has song recordings. Click on the link above for more on this beautiful bird.

Many of the Cornell Lab’s Bird Cams give you views into the newly-hatched baby birds. Here’s a link to the Red-tailed Hawks. Across the top of the page you can find more live bird cams to visit. Cornell Lab Bird Cams/Red-tailed Hawks.

Perspective, Pheathers and Phascination – Hello Friends!

Today I conceded that WordPress Blogs are the most user-friendly, and paid the fee for my blog’s overabundant media library. This will give me another year blogging at WordPress. I suppose I should say…I’m back.

I’m sharing the Cornell Lab Bird Cams as a start-up post. I’ve been especially intrigued with the Hawk, Fruit Feeders, and Savannah Osprey Cams. I’ve included them in my post. The bird cams are one of my favorite places to visit online. Enjoy!

Pheathers – Oh Happy Day!

This morning I spied him/her for the first time. The hummingbird circled around the shepherd’s hook where the hummingbird feeder hung last year. I shouted out the happy news to my husband. When I’m finished this post I’ll take my feeder off the garage shelf, soak in hot sudsy water, rinse it well, fill it with boiled sugar water, and place it back on the hook. Oh Happy Day…the hummers have returned.

While I’m readying my yard for hummingbirds, take a look at the Cornell Lab West Texas hummingbird feeders in Live time.

Pheathers & Pages – The Life of Birds and Bird Cams

life-of-birds

I can’t remember where I found this book on ‘The Life of Birds,’ written by David Attenborough, most likely on a library, thrift shop or yard sale treasure hunt. I’ve read through the first chapter, and have found the accompanying BBC/PBS series available on Amazon. This weekend I’ll watch the coinciding show of the series and then read another chapter in the book.

One of the joys in my life is the birds that I see and hear throughout the day. This week I took my camera with me on a walk around the block. The trees were filled with red-wing blackbirds, grackles, starlings, and other birds that flock with them.

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I have included the Cornell Lab of Ornithology bird cams in my posts many times, and will probably point the way to them in the future also. They are amazing, and just about now some of the birds might be ‘feathering’ their nests in preparation for new life.

Take a look at the Sapsucker Woods Bird Feeder. I enjoy the sounds as much as the sights of these live cams.

All the bird cams can be found here: Cornell Lab of Ornithology Bird Cams. Some aren’t online now, but will probably be back soon.

Pheathers – Bird-Watching Cams

I enjoy the many bird cams Cornell Lab of Ornithology offers on its website and Youtube Channel. Even now, as I write this post, I have another window open on my computer and I’m listening to the live chirping of the birds feeding at the Ithaca New York bird feeders.

“This FeederWatch cam is located in the Treman Bird Feeding Garden at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Perched on the edge of both Sapsucker Woods and its 10-acre pond, these feeders attract both forest species like chickadees and woodpeckers as well as some species that prefer open environments near water like Red-winged Blackbirds.”

Watching birds outside your window, or on one of these cams, is guaranteed to brighten the dreariest winter day.

Pheathers – Hummingbird

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I plant nectar-producing flowers each year in hopes of attracting hummingbirds and butterflies. This has been a banner year for both. Our gardens are visited daily by dozens of butterflies and at least three to four hummingbirds.

We’ve noticed the tiny hummingbirds are the bravest birds in the yard. One hummer seems to know our habits, and when the feeder is removed for cleaning and refilling, he/she will hover near the kitchen window doing its best to prompt us to hurry and bring out the nectar.

I have mixed feelings about hummingbird feeders. If they are not cleaned and maintained daily, they can be lethal to hummingbirds. “Top-10 Hummingbird Nectar Mistakes”

I’ve been concerned over whether I should leave my feeder up through the Autumn months. I was glad to come upon this bit of information on the web:

Some people may be concerned that leaving a feeder up will prevent hummingbirds from migrating in the fall. This is a myth. Hummingbirds (and all migratory birds) have an internal “clock” that tells them when to migrate. No healthy hummingbird would ever stick around just because you’ve left your feeder up in the fall. ~Bird Watcher’s Digest

When the hummingbirds in my yard migrate, I know I will immediately begin to stream the Cornell Lab Hummingbird Cam, and find my hummingbird joy from their amazing live cameras.  Happy, Happy, Joy, Joy = Hummingbirds

Pheathers & Phavorites – Barn Owl/Live Cam

I came upon this year’s nesting Barn Owl and realized it was time to repost the information for Cornell Bird Labs.

Take a look at the live-streamed “Bird Cams.” If you love birds you will love this site. To start the live cam click on the arrow. If it appears to be a still shot, look closely, you will see the soft movement of the owl’s breath. Thanks again to JaneM who shared this site with me.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology Bird Cam

Pheathers – The Junco

Photograph courtesy of Acrylic Artist on Morgue File
Photograph courtesy of Acrylic Artist on Morgue File

I know winter is approaching when the Juncos arrive at my bird feeder.

Dark-eyed Juncos are neat, even flashy little sparrows that flit about forest floors of the western mountains and Canada, then flood the rest of North America for winter. They’re easy to recognize by their crisp (though extremely variable) markings and the bright white tail feathers they habitually flash in flight. One of the most abundant forest birds of North America, you’ll see juncos on woodland walks as well as in flocks at your feeders or on the ground beneath them.
~ Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Pheathers – Nesting Part I

The birds are all a-twitter. Time to lay out some string and others soft materials for their nests. This is a great project for children to participate in.

Nesting material, cut short and scattered over twigs.
Nesting material, cut short and scattered over twigs.

“HOW TO OFFER NEST MATERIAL

•Place nesting materials, such as twigs and leaves, in piles on the ground—other materials, too, if they won’t blow away.
•Put fluffy materials, hair, and fur in clean wire-mesh suet cages, or in string or plastic mesh bags. Attach them to tree trunks, fence posts, or deck railings. The birds will pull out the material through the mesh holes.
•Push material into tree crevices or drape it over vegetation.
•Put material into an open-topped, plastic berry basket (such as strawberries are sold in).
•Some manufacturers sell spiral wire hangers especially for putting out nest material. (One type looks like an oversized honey-dipper.)
~ The Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Don’t be too quick to clean all of winter’s debris from your yard.


Gather up some of these items in your yard into small concentrated piles:
•Dead twigs
•Dead leaves
•Dry grass (make sure the grass hadn’t been treated with pesticides)
•Human or animal hair (especially horse hair) (use short lengths—no longer than 4-6 inches long)
•Pet fur (Never use fur from pets that received flea or tick treatments)
•Sheep’s wool
•Feathers
•Plant fluff or down (e.g. cattail fluff, cottonwood down)
•Kapok, cotton batting, or other stuffing material
•Moss
•Bark strips
•Pine needles
~ The Cornell Lab of Ornithology