Phloral Arrangements – Monday in a Vase/Bejeweled

“Many eyes go through the meadow, but few see the flowers in it.” ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

Monday Morning Blues are non-existent when flowers start my day. The last dahlia bud of the year has opened into a spectacular disk that for some reason makes me think of ferris wheels. The pristine white of the petals is set off by the aged blooms of magenta hydrangeas, matured now into a lovely mix of chartreuse and deep maroon. Dried garlic chive umbels/branches sprayed metallic bronze give added interest. The milk glass vase, a Victorian posy holder, seems a good match for the dahlia bloom. This arrangement is part of In A Vase Monday, hosted by Rambling in the Garden.

Garlic Chive Umbels, dried perfectly on the plant.

Garlic Chives – This is a strong recommendation, a definite 10 out of 10, for this wonderful plant. The leaves are great as a garnish and taste delicious snipped into soups and salads. Even better, the starry-white flowering stalks are stunning in late summer. Left alone, they dry into strong, dried flowers. After shaking out the seeds, which I will save for next year, I sprayed the dried umbels with paint in a metallic shade. I have another project in mind for these, but that will have to wait until later in the month. If you have a chance to cultivate this plant in your garden, you won’t be disappointed.

Phloral Arrangement – In A Vase on Monday/Halloween Hedgerows and Garden Beds

This Autumn Bouquet arranged for ‘In a Vase Monday,’ was created using flowers from my garden and hedgerows surrounding a park near my home. Flowers featured: Sedum, Celosia, Mexican Sage, Zinnias, Honeysuckle, Milkweed pods, and Dandelion Poufs. The harmony of colors ranges from the Espresso Brown of the Sedum to the bright orange tones of the zinnia. Purple seems to be a popular Halloween shade and was a good addition to the bouquet.

“Already the dandelions are changed into vanishing ghosts.”- Celia Thaxter

The spooky quote by Celia Thaxter seemed doubly appropriate for Halloween and the bedraggled appearance of one of my Dandelion poufs.

The other was still in good shape when I came upon it. Both are included in my bouquet, their weak stems supported within the twisted rows of the Celosia.

I was surprised to find a stem of honeysuckle in bloom, out of season, but very welcome in the cooler days of Autumn.

“There is a child in every one of us who is still a trick-or-treater looking for a brightly-lit front porch.” —Robert Brault

Phloral Arrangements – Lilies Extraordinaire

I think the ‘extraordinaire’ in my title fits this lovely vase of lilies. The bouquet is still going strong 10 days after the purchase of the flower stems. Most of the buds were closed when I brought them home, but a diagonal cut along the bottom, a bit of flower food in warmish water, and several lilies unfurled within 24 hours. Arranging each stem opposite another, giving the vase a turn before continuing on, creates an intricate design aspect through the glass vase rather than a bunched-up mass. Today, I cut away the first of the faded blossoms. There are still many flowers left in bloom, and a couple of promising buds still ready to burst. The fragrance is strong and distinctive of lilies.

You might be wondering why the open blossom is missing the dark anthers that are within the bud beside it. I learned this tip while taking classes on floral design: lily anthers are staining. If the pollen dust on them touches clothing, table coverings, or upholstery, the stain is usually impossible to remove. As the lilies open, I remove the anthers and dispose of them. I love the way they look, but I know from experience, remove them.

If you like the ‘freckled’ appearance the pollen gives the petals, gently tap the anthers over the petals before removing. Be aware though, even this small amount of pollen can cause a big stain.

My vase of lilies is part of Cees Flower of the Day Challenge.