Phlower – Tuberose Begonias

I purchased this beautiful Begonia last week. Shhhhh….if truth be told, I purchased three of them and placed them in a terracotta pot to grow indoors. The plants fill a 10 inch pot, creating a gorgeous view from all sides. I’ve been turning the pot a quarter turn each day to keep the stems growing and blooming evenly. I have the plants in one of my sunniest windows.

I’ve grown begonias sold for outdoor planting, indoors, for many years. They do very well living inside the house. The one problem area I need to be careful of is not letting the top of the soil become soggy. I plan to use some of my leftover seed starter mix on the top layer. I have a devil of a time getting this medium to become wet for planting. Maybe it will be the perfect soil topping for the begonias, and keep their lower stems dry, while easily letting water reach the roots below. Another tip for growing begonias in terracotta is to frequently wipe the upper lip of the pot with a damp rag. This will remove built up salts that could eat through a stem that rests upon the pot’s rim.

I found a good site with great information on growing tuberose begonias outdoors – Longfield Gardens – TIPS FOR GROWING TUBEROUS BEGONIAS.

My beautiful pink begonia is part of Cee’s Flower of the Day.

Plant & Phloral Arrangements – Bargain Elegance

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Page through any high-end magazine or decorating book and you will often find Phalaenopsis orchids as a main focal point in the decor. The long stems, large green leaves, and gorgeous flowers are the perfect plant for any home. Phalaenopsis orchids are my first choice for an elegant flowering plant or gift.

I worked for several years as a floral designer. When an order was placed for an orchid delivery, I often put together floral pieces much like the orchid in the photograph. These plants had a big price tag, usually $50.00 – $60.00, not including a large delivery fee. A better choice is to make your plant a DIY project.

Phalaenopsis orchids are available just about everywhere. I bought the one in the photograph for $7.99 at my local Aldi Grocery Store. I have a stash of thrift store and yard sale ceramics set aside for dressing up houseplants. The one in the photo was a $2.00 purchase.

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One drawback of most Phalaenopsis orchids is their tendency to lean. To straighten the pot I use foil wedged in around the orchid pot. Since the orchid and the potting medium is light, this works perfectly to hold it in place.

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The moss that covers the top was an item gathered near my home. Dried for a week or so, excess dirt brushed away, the moss perfectly dresses up the top of the pot, and hides the mechanics beneath it. This orchid brings elegance to any room, yet is very economical at just $10.00. Give this design a try the next time you see orchids for sale at a great price.

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Phlowers & Phloral Arrangements – Alstroemeria

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“Alstroemeria, commonly called the Peruvian lily or lily of the Incas, is a genus of flowering plants in the family Alstroemeriaceae. They are all native to South America although some have become naturalized in the United States, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Madeira and the Canary Islands.” ~ Wikipedia

Alstroemeria (Peruvian Lily) are one of my favorite flowers for floral arrangements. When I trained to become a floral designer, I learned a few tips about this plant. The first step in floral arranging is to remove all the foliage that is below the water line. Alstroemeria has an abundance of leaves. One odd fact about alstroemeria is the foliage along the stem will yellow and die before the flower petals begin to fall. Most floral stems lose their flowers first. When I prepare alstroemeria for vases I remove ALL the foliage BELOW the blossoms. I keep the leaves intact that are attached to the blossoming offshoots. Your flowers will stay fresh longer if you remove the lower leaves. Alstroemeria are available anywhere you buy flower bunches and come in an amazing array of colors. They are very thirsty so check your vase and arrangement water daily to keep them hydrated and fresh.

Postscript: Thanks to Lulu for reminding me about the very best characteristic of Alstroemeria…they are one of the longest-lasting flowers to use in arrangements. 🙂