Praise – Charles Haddon Spurgeon/John’s Doxology/Part 8 – Pardoning Mercy

Lent began this week. I was raised in a denomination that didn’t keep Lent by sacrificing a favorite item or changing a habit. Nevertheless, I decided this past week that perhaps it would be good for me to try to change a bad habit during Lent, and for me, it is negative words. I’m sure most of you living in the U.S., and all over the world, are able to understand my negative words in the current circumstances of pandemic, virulent politics, right turned into wrong, and wrong turned into right. Add into that everyday stresses and it is a heavy burden for all of us.

I wish my sincere commitment had translated into a successful attempt at keeping my words positive. I lasted only three hours into Wednesday, the first day of Lent, before I missed the mark. By noon, I had blown it big time. The trigger – I was made to feel inadequate. My failure most likely traces back, as does all sin, to Satan in the garden with Eve. He appealed to her pride, but perhaps before pride caused the fall into sin, Eve believed herself inadequate.

The trigger of implied inadequacy caused me to say things, that while true, should have remained within for Jesus to help me deal with in His time. I thank him for his pardoning mercy. I’m still trying to keep my words positive through the rest of the Lenten season, but with so many satanic attacks flying toward us all it’s hard not to become a bit dour and grumble.

I know perhaps my words aren’t uplifting, but perhaps you can relate to them. I would be false if I put out the impression that I never fail, or don’t get the blues, or have struggles of my own. Through it all, I am glad for the pardoning mercy of him who has cleansed us from our sin. He will show me the path through this time. Amen.

Jesus und der Gang nach Emmaus (Jesus and the walk to Emmaus) – Gebhard Fugel, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons (turn of the 19/20th century)

C.H. Spurgeon – John’s Doxology

So, too, with the washing from sin. It is enough to make us sing of pardoning mercy for ever and ever if we have been cleansed from sin but the center of the joy is to adore him “that washed us from our sins in his own blood.” Observe that he cleansed us, not by some process outside of himself, but by the shedding of his own blood of reconciliation. It brings the blood-washing into the highest estimation with the heart when we look into the wounds from whence the atonement flowed, when we gaze upon that dear visage so sadly marred, that brow so grievously scarred, and even peer into the heart which was pierced by the spear for us to furnish a double cleansing for our sin. “Unto him that washed us.” The disciples were bound to love the hands that took the basin and poured water on their feet, and the loins which were girt with the towel for their washing; and we, brethren, must do the same. But as for the washing with his own blood, how shall we ever praise him enough? Well may we sing the new song, saying, “Thou art worthy, for thou wast slain, and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood.” This puts body and weight into our praise when we have realized him, and understood how distinctly these precious deeds of love as well as the love itself come from him whose sacred heart is all our own.

Praise – Charles Haddon Spurgeon/John’s Doxology Part 5 – Roses and Harps

“As roses are ready to shed their perfume, so may we be eager to praise God—“

Before the pandemic arrived, one of my favorite wintertime activities was visiting the conservatory at Longwood Gardens. I haven’t been there since all this craziness consumed the world. The gardens have procedures in place to allow visitors once again. If I make a reservation, I will be able to leave winter behind when I walk through the doors into garden bliss. The fragrance, and a sweet humid heaviness in the air, are what I crave most at this time of year.

As is the case in most of Spurgeon’s sermon on John’s Doxology, his descriptive words, likening roses shedding their perfume to our praise for our Creator, fill me with renewed purpose to praise my Father in Heaven even more.

” I long that our hearts may be like Eolian harps through which each wind as it sweeps on its way makes charming music.”

Johns Doxology – Charles Haddon Spurgeon
This spontaneous outburst of John’s love is what I am going to preach upon this morning. First of all I shall ask you to consider the condition of heart out of which such outbursts come, and then we will look more closely at the outburst itself; for my great desire is that you and I may often be thus transported into praise, carried off into ecstatic worship. I long that our hearts may be like Eolian harps through which each wind as it sweeps on its way makes charming music. As roses are ready to shed their perfume, so may we be eager to praise God; so much delighting in the blessed exercise of adoration that we shall plunge into it when colder hearts do not expect us to do so. I have read of Mr. Welch, a minister in Suffolk, that he was often seen to be weeping, and when asked why, he replied that he wept because he did not love Christ more. May not many of us weep that we do not praise him more? Oh that our meditation may be used or the Holy Spirit to help us in that direction!

Praise – Charles Haddon Spurgeon/John’s Doxology Part 2 – Magnify the Savior’s Name

“Now, in the matter of this bursting out of devotion at unexpected times, John is one among the rest of the apostles. Their love to their divine Master was so intense that they had only to hear his footfall and their pulse began to quicken, and if they heard his voice, then were they carried clean away: whether in the body or out of the body, they could not tell, but they were under constraint to MAGNIFY THE SAVIOUR’S NAME; whatever they were doing they felt compelled to pause at once, to render direct and distinct homage unto the Lord Jesus by adoration and doxology. Observe how Paul breaks forth into doxologies: “Now unto him that is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think, according to the power that worketh in us, unto him be glory in the church by Christ Jesus throughout all ages, world without end. Amen.” Again: “Now unto the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, be honour and glory for ever and ever. Amen.” The like is true of Jude, who cries: “Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, to the only wise God our Saviour, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever. Amen.” The apostles overflowed with praise.” ~Charles Haddon Spurgeon (John’s Doxology)

Bible Portal lists over 200 names of Jesus. I enjoyed reading this list of the names of Jesus. I thought of a few that were missing, but all in all it is a pretty comprehensive list. I also felt uplifted as I created my own visual poster for this post using a few of the names most meaningful to me, and also those I consider most important.

Spurgeon’s sermon, combined with scripture, brings a burst of joy and faithfulness out of me. I hope to magnify the name of Jesus through all my life. I hold each of his beautiful names dear to my heart.

    Charles Haddon Spurgeon was known as the ‘Prince of Preachers.’ A terrific biography of him can be found on the Spurgeon Center’s Blog: Who is Charles Haddon Spurgeon. 

  • Savior and Saviour are both acceptable spellings of one of Jesus’ names.

Praise – Charles Haddon Spurgeon/John’s Doxology Part I

    Charles Haddon Spurgeon was known as the ‘Prince of Preachers.’ A terrific biography of him can be found on the Spurgeon Center’s Blog: Who is Charles Haddon Spurgeon. 

I love to read the beautiful words of praise Charles Spurgeon preached. One of my favorite sermons is titled, John’s First Doxology.

Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit 1

JOHN’S FIRST DOXOLOGY

SEPTEMBER 2, 1883,
BY C. H. SPURGEON,
AT EXETER HALL.


“Unto Him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in His own blood, and has made us kings and priests unto God and His Father; to Him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.” ~Revelation 1:5, 6


JOHN had hardly begun to deliver his message to the seven churches. He had hardly given in his name and stated from whom the message came, when he felt that he must lift up his heart in a joyful doxology. The very mention of the name of the Lord Jesus, “the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the Prince of the kings of the earth,” fired his heart. He could not sit down coolly to write even what the Spirit of God dictated, he must rise, he must fall upon his knees, and he must bless, and magnify and adore the Lord Jesus. This text is just the upward burst of a great geyser of devotion. John’s spirit had been quiet for a while, but all of a sudden the stream of his love to Jesus leaps forth like a fountain, rising so high that it would seem to bedew heaven itself with its sparkling column of crystal love. Look at the ascending flood as you read the words, “Unto Him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in His own blood, and has made us kings and priests unto God and His Father; to Him be glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.”

Truth is timeless. Beautiful praise for our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ is timeless. I like to read this sermon out loud, but I must confess, in the midst of the praise of these paragraphs, I become so touched and blessed by the Holy Spirit, I rarely reach the end of even one paragraph without breaking down into tears of joy.

I don’t know when the idea to share this sermon, over the course of a year of Sundays, came to me, but it did, and so through 2021 I hope to share a portion, and perhaps a short comment, on what the words mean to me.

‘—Fired his heart—‘ I hope my own heart is fired this year of 2021. In the midst of what seems to be so much encroaching evil I want to turn my eyes toward the Lord Jesus Christ even more. When I feel the power of the Lord Jesus rest upon me, I must do as John and Spurgeon did, I must adore Him. I must share the Good News. I must let my joy in him ‘leap forth like a fountain.’

I ask you to read the words of John and Spurgeon out loud. We can all add some praise into the cacophony of so much contemptible negativity and attempted mind-control. The best defense against evil is praising the Lord and calling upon His Holy Name. Amen.