Project – Faux Wooden Easter Eggs

I blogged about this project last year, and since it was one of my favorites, I thought it deserved a repeat.

I love the appearance of wooden Easter eggs, but they can cost a pretty penny when hand-painted and strung for hanging. I found an alternative, but I must also include a warning: these faux eggs might magically disappear before you can use them for Easter decorating.

Malted Easter Eggs
Malted Easter Eggs

I recently purchased a package of  malted Easter eggs in my local drugstore. I chose them for their eye-appeal; covered in pastel candy, speckled in darker pastels, the malted eggs were small, delicate and irresistible.. While I was pondering all the ways I could rig them for hanging, I ate one…then another, and so on…and you know the end of my tale, by the time I had a plan in place half my eggs had disappeared.

Skewering an Egg
Skewering an Egg

To create a hole for threading, place the malted egg on a wash cloth or other thick cloth, pointy end up. Place a barbecue skewer, ice pick, heavy-duty toothpick, etc., on the top and slowly twist until it penetrates the outer shell. Continue twisting and applying pressure until the skewer reaches the bottom of the egg and exits through the bottom.

Malted Easter Eggs with Ribbons
Malted Easter Eggs with Ribbons

A thin looped ribbon was easily pushed through with a toothpick, and knotted on the larger end. Voila`, easy faux wooden eggs for a fraction of the cost. The eggs won’t last more than one season, but if they did I would miss the fun of making (and eating) them again next year.