Photo Challenges – Yellow Sunshine in the Raindrops

The photos in this post are part of Cee’s Midweek Madness Challenge – May Macro. This dahlia, and others, are waiting to be planted in pots alongside my front porch.

These pretty begonias will be planted alongside of them. I usually plant in pink color schemes in the front, this year I’ve decided on sunshine yellows and purple.

The torenia has a pool of rainwater in the center.

Torenia is also known as the wishbone flower. I shook away the water from this blossom so the wishbone would be visible.

Phlowers – Dahlia Show

Longwood Gardens and The Greater Philadelphia Dahlia Society hosted The American Dahlia Society’s 2018 National Show this past weekend. I was able to attend and admire the many varieties. My husband and I are inspired to grow a few named varieties of dahlias in next year’s garden. We both had our favorites. I loved the large dinner plate dahlias. My favorite was the pink and yellow bloom.  These dahlias are part of Cee’s Flower of the Day. 

My husband likes the simpler daisy-like blossom. I’m sure there is room for both our favorites in our 2019 gardens. It will be fun to research and plan ahead throughout the winter months. 

I love this view of the display. The spectators blend right into the blooms and seem to be part of the beautiful indoor garden. 

Dahlia love: A garden of dahlias and admirers. 

Longwood Gardens has a very informative article on growing dahlias: Growing Dahlias at Home

There are several sources for dahlia tubers in the US, I’ve included a sampling:

Swan Islands Dahlias 

Corralito’s Gardens

Another good source for dahlia information can be found at the Dahlia Addict site.

Plants – Mid-Spring Garden Update

I’ve been spending a lot of time in the garden: planting, weeding, watering and tidying up. Likewise, the garden has been the subject of quite a few recent posts. Here are a few quick updates on some past posts, and then I’ll try to turn my blogging intentions elsewhere, at least for a few days. 😀

Birdie, birdie in the tree

Sparrows made use of my birdhouse and the tree has been a-twitter with the chirping of baby birds for over a week.

Koi in Pond

I’ve been enjoying the pond, it is on the small size, but the koi are huge. They don’t seem to mind the small confines. Two have grown to twelve inches from three/four inch sized babies.

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A coleus grown from my own gathered seed has finally, after years of pampering, become a beauty. I love the finely edged leaves and vivid pink color. I named it Raspberry Twizzle. It has the characteristics of other coleus I have grown, but I have never seen such a brilliant pink in other coleus. I love it.

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I love my potted pansies and dahlia near the front porch.

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I found an old favorite, Mimulus, or monkey flower at a local nursery. The plant is heat intolerant, so I am growing it in pots on the porch.

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My Meyer Lemon and  Carambola sprouts are also vacationing on the porch for the summer. At some point I am going to have to decide which to keep and which to give away or discard.

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I replaced a rose that didn’t make it through our long winter with one of the Hasslefree Roses variety. I love this beautiful apricot beauty called: About Face.

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The Tomato Transplants in the Straw Bales are doing very well, so are a crop of mushrooms. The mushrooms sprout up overnight and succumb to the heat of the afternoon sun. They don’t seem to be doing the tomatoes any harm. This new technique of growing tomatoes has been a lot of fun.

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The Square Foot Gardens are up and doing well.

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Our Iris plants in this area are blooming weeks later than usual. Here is my favorite. I can’t remember the name, but oh the joy I feel when it unfurls its amazing pink petals. The blooming of this beauty prompted me to go on my yearly “Iris Hunt.” My “hunt ” is a long, circular bike ride through all the surrounding neighborhoods to find and photograph as many gorgeous Iris as possible. More on this at a later date. Thanks for looking, and thanks to those who have been asking me for this garden update. Blessings on your day!

Plant & Painting – Dahlias/Update & WetCanvas April Plant Parade

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My Dahlia Experiment is succeeding at an astonishing rate. One of the tubers has grown into an eighteen inch plant with many of the others following close behind.

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All six tubers have sprouted. It’s time to repot one more time into individual containers. I will grow the dahlias on in these containers until there is no danger of frost. At that point I will transfer them into my garden beds.

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As I stated in an earlier post, my reason for starting the tubers indoors is the dahlia in the photograph below. I purchased this plant from a nursery several years ago. I’ve never had a better blooming dahlia, and I’m hoping for the same success with the tubers I started early.

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The WetCanvas plant parade flower for April is the Dahlia. Here is a link to the thread and the information.

WetCanvas Plant Parade – April 2015/Dahlias

GUIDELINES FOR POSTING IN THE WETCANVAS PLANT PARADE

 

“Please don’t post your paintings until 25th April, which is “reveal day”. It’s much more fun if we all post our paintings on more or less the same day. So when the 25th rolls around wherever you are…post your painting/drawing of Dahlias then.

You can draw, paint, sketch etc, use any medium you wish and change the photos as much as you like. You can zoom in add 2 photos together etc but make sure your flower is this months’ subject THE DAHLIA

You can ask any questions, discuss anything to do with this Plant Parade and generally enjoy talking to other members about it BUT please don’t post your artwork until 25th April.”

Here are two of the reference dahlias for the April Plant Parade courtesy of Vivian Maloney.

Dahlia - Courtesy of WetCanvas and Vivian Maloney
Dahlia – Courtesy of WetCanvas and Vivian Maloney

Dahlia - Courtesy of WetCanvas and Vivian Maloney
Dahlia – Courtesy of WetCanvas and Vivian Maloney

Plants – Flower Garden Update/August 2012


My late-summer flower garden is thriving. The Rudbeckia is full of blossoms. I don’t deadhead these flowers. They do not produce more blooms if I do so, and then I would deprive the finches of their treat. These flowers produce hundreds of seeds and are a favorite of the goldfinches. I often see the small birds hanging upside down on the seed heads, feasting on the bounty.

The Coral Nymph Salvia is a beautiful plant. It almost becomes shrub-like as the season progresses. I do deadhead the spent flower stalks of this plant, and it keeps producing until cold weather. It is a favorite of hummingbirds.

This Salvia self-seeded last summer, grew in a crack between the sidewalk and front porch steps, and is thriving. I will save seeds from this plant this fall. It has a resilience and determination I admire.

The Popsock Cosmos I grew this year is a bit taller than I had thought it would be, but is still a welcome addition to the front garden.

These cheerful petunias I bought on a whim this spring have been fantastic. I love the bright color and the abundance of blooms they have given me.

The coleus plants in the front garden are outstanding. I will soon let them begin to flower for next year’s seed harvest.

The asters I grew by winter-sowing are beautiful. They come in a variety of purple, lavender and pink shades. I am really pleased with this plant.

The Bonariensis Verbena is often perennial. This patch grew tall and broad this year and is constantly attracting butterflies. Last year it also self-seeded, and I have several new patches of this great plant.

Dahlias grown from seed and sun-loving impatiens (a Mother’s Day gift) are all doing well.

Here is one of my mistakes, although I love the lilypad-like foliage. I planted nasturtium in fertilized soil, and the foliage is abundant, but the flowers non-existent. They prefer to grow in poor soil.

Both varieties of Fuschia are doing well, as are both varieties of the Dragon-wing Begonias.

 

Last but not least is my Lady In Red Salvia, a great hummingbird flower. I love the little hover-fly sipping nectar that I captured in the photograph below.