Projects – Snowflakes Panoply

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I have a brand new panoply of paper snowflakes on my window panes this year. Creating these inexpensive Christmas decorations is one of my joys. All it takes to make these lacy echoes of real snowflakes, is a bit of folding and snipping.

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You will need squares of paper. Computer paper is a good choice for snowflakes. I use different sizes, eight, seven, six, five and four-inch squares. All of these sizes are fairly easy to fold and cut.

Fold the square into a triangle shape by matching catty-corners, or in more modern terms, opposite corners.

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After the first fold is complete, using the corners on the long side of the triangle, fold the paper corner to corner once more.

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This next part is a little tricky. Let the longer side of the triangle face away from you. Bring up the right corner and fold it about a third of a way from the middle. Turn the paper over and repeat this step. You will have an accordion folded piece of paper with two bunny-type ears if you have folded it correctly. If this step is confusing watching the video at the bottom of the post will help.

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After I fold the triangle into this shape, I trim the ‘ears’ off leaving a cone shape. This does not have to be perfectly rounded, you will be cutting into it.

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* Important * You must always leave a bit of the folded sides intact to keep the snowflake whole. Don’t worry if you accidentally cut one and have it fall to pieces…it’s only paper after all.

Begin cutting your snowflake. Try to use both rounded cuts and straight snips. The combination of round and straight will give your snowflake a natural look. After cutting, open up, and prepare to be amazed by your beautiful handiwork.

I like to place the finished snowflakes in the windows of the house. Because the indoor heat causes condensation, the next step is especially important if you are using them on windows.

Iron the snowflakes between sheets of waxed paper. The layer of wax deposited on the paper will create a barrier against moisture. If you are using a good iron, protect it and the ironing board.  Cover the board with an old cloth and use layers of newspaper beneath and over the waxed paper before you begin. The heat of the iron will penetrate the layers of newspaper and melt the wax onto the paper. You might need to change the newspaper several times. I use the waxed paper only one time, use a new sheet, top and bottom, for each batch of snowflakes. * Important * Have a lot of newspaper on hand if you are using a good iron.

I remove the waxed paper immediately after ironing by pulling the two pieces apart.  The snowflakes are ready to glue to your windows.

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Glue??? Yes, you read right. I recommend Elmer’s Disappearing Purple School Glue. Unless you want to spend hours and hours peeling and scraping tape residue from your windows, use a washable glue stick. A glue stick does leave a bit of residue when you take down the snowflakes, but it’s easy to remove with a wet rag. A spray of window cleaner and you would never know glue had been on your windows.

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Phavorites – November Reruns

This is my fifth year creating content for “Minding My P’s with Q.” Some good ideas and posts from past years are buried deep in the archives. I’ve unearthed a few November “phavorites” from 2011 to the present to share once again.

Sweet Potato Vine

Growing a Sweet Potato Vine is easy and a fun way to continue gardening indoors.

the stowaway

When you bring in your houseplants from the porch and yard be sure to check for Stowaways.

pumpkin cookies

Pumpkin Cookies, nutritious and delicious, are a perfect November snack.

pressed flower house

You can use Pressed Autumn Leaves to create structures within pressed flower cards.

milk carton cloche

A Milk Carton Cloche is an easy way to extend your growing season.

Amaryllis

Amaryllis are available now as bulbs or potted plants for Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday cheer.

Paper Snowflakes on my windows are one of my favorite Christmas decorations. To have enough by December 1st, I will begin cutting at least five every day.

Last, but certainly not least, enjoy the beautiful “A Song of Thanksgiving” by U2.

Project – Tutorial Trio/Snowflakes & Floral Bows

It’s the time of year to begin gathering ideas for the upcoming Autumn and Winter seasons. I’ve posted all three of these tutorials in the past, but decided to resurrect them for the coming holiday seasons. I will be starting to cut snowflakes for December decorating any day now. I like to have eight in each window. When you add it up, that’s a lot of snowflakes to cut. If I cut one or two per day I have more than I need by December 1st.

The first video in my trio explains how to create paper snowflakes.

The second snowflake video shows you how to coat the paper with wax so that moisture from the winter windows does not ruin all your work.

The third video demonstrates how to make a large-sized oblong bow for wreaths or packages.

It’s a good idea to get a jumpstart on plans and crafts for the upcoming holiday seasons of the Autumn and Winter. A little bit done each week equals less stress as the holidays draw near.

Phavorites – Snowflakes

Over the course of December I’m going to be sorting through archives, deleting some posts, and re-blogging some that I consider the best or most popular. I’ll start with one for the upcoming Christmas season – PAPER SNOWFLAKES – one of my favorites.

I love cutting paper snowflakes. This year all my front and side windows have are decorated with snowflakes. I’ve included two Youtube videos below with directions.